The Doors Of Perception – Book Review

The Doors of Perception is an account of Aldous Huxley’s experience with the hallucinogenic drug mescaline. Full of wonderful descriptions of his deep insights into human nature and his vast apprehensions of an ultimate reality. Instead of writing about the book in depth, I have chosen to share my favourite highlights from the book.

If men’s doors of perception were cleansed he would see everything as it is, infinite

We live together, we act on, and react to, one another; but always and in all circumstances we are by ourselves. The martyrs go hand in hand into the arena; they are crucified alone. Embraced, the lovers desperately try to fuse their insulated ecstasies into a single self-transcendence; in vain. By its very nature every embodied spirit is doomed to suffer and enjoy in solitude.

The mind is its own place, and the places inhabited by the insane and the exceptionally gifted are so different from the places where ordinary men and women live, that there is little or no common ground of memory to serve as a basis for understanding or fellow feeling.

 

To make biological survival possible, Mind at Large has to be funnelled through the reducing valve of the brain and nervous system. What comes out at the other end is a measly trickle of the kind of consciousness which will help us to stay alive on the surface of this particular planet.

 

What the rest of us see only under the influence of mescalin, the artist is congenitally equipped to see all the time. His perception is not limited to what is biologically or socially useful.

 

Confronted by a chair which looked like the Last Judgment – or, to be more accurate, by a Last Judgment which, after a long time and with considerable difficulty, I recognized as a chair – I found myself all at once on the brink of panic. This, I suddenly felt, was going too far. Too far, even though the going was into intenser beauty, deeper significance. The fear, as I analyse it in retrospect, was of being overwhelmed, of disintegrating under a pressure of reality greater than a mind, accustomed to living most of the time in a cosy world of symbols, could possibly bear. The literature of religious experience abounds in references to the pains and terrors overwhelming those who have come, too suddenly, face to face with some manifestation of the Mysterium tremendum. In theological language, this fear is due to the incompatibility between man’s egotism and the divine purity, between man’s self-aggravated separateness and the infinity of God. Following Boehme and William Law, we may say that, by unregenerate souls, the divine Light at its full blaze can be apprehended only as a burning, purgatorial fire.

 

In it two great appetites of the soul – the urge to independence and self-determination and the urge to self-transcendence – were fused with, and interpreted in the light of, a third – the urge to worship, to justify the ways of God to man, to explain the universe by means of a coherent theology.

 

How the gravity of Nature and her silence startle you, when you stand face to face with her, undistracted, before a barren ridge or in the desolation of the ancient hills.

In a world where education is predominantly verbal, highly educated people find it all but impossible to pay serious attention to anything but words and notions. There is always money for, there are always doctorates in, the learned foolery of research into what, for scholars, is the all-important problem: Who influenced whom to say what when? Even in this age of technology the verbal Humanities are honoured. The non-verbal Humanities, the arts of being directly aware of the given facts of our existence, are almost completely ignored.

 

But the man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read through these highlights, these are just some of the amazing snippets from this book. I’d highly recommend reading it as it’s only a short read and will really open your mind to new ideas. I’d love to hear your favourite highlights from the book or any thoughts you’ve had whilst reading it, so please leave a comment below!

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Hi, I'm Will. I'm a young entrepreneur, coffee nerd, blogger, and pilot. I have an obsession with being efficient and working the smartest way possible. People that I take inspiration from are Tim Ferriss, Joe Rogan, Elon Musk, Derick Sivers and Steve Jobs. I'm writing this blog mainly to make myself better at blogging, and to share my journey as an entrepreneur, with the hope that others can learn random things, or think about new ideas. Enjoy!

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Hi, I'm Will. I'm a young entrepreneur, Founder at Bunaberry Coffee Co and obsessed with becoming the best version of myself. My blog is a way of giving back to others all of all the knowledge I gain on my journey through entrepreneurship and life. My aim is to inspire others to realise their full potential and excel in life.

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